Daylight saving time: how to survive by changing your diet and lifestyle habits

Ora Legale

Every year pretty much everywhere in the world, there’s a moment of the year when the daylight saving time arrives. In many countries, this means the arrival of summer and for this reason, if on the one hand, we are anxious to see the days that get longer and the temperatures that get hot, on the other hand, we are not immune to the consequences that the arrival of summertime brings. In fact, if it is true that the days are lengthened, it is also true that having to move the clock an hour forward means we sleep an hour less each night compared to the winter period. This leads to imbalances in our body, which we can try to soften by adopting a diet of a certain type and following a certain lifestyle.

Daylight Saving Time: when the time changes in 2018?

Usually, the daylight saving time starts in Europe the last Sunday of March between 1 am and 3 am, but it varies in other countries so I recommend you check this useful chart by Wikipedia to know when daylight saving time starts in your area or in the area you’re traveling to.

THE EFFECTS OF THE DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME ON OUR BODY

These are just some of the side effects of daylight saving which can last for up to 3 weeks:

WE SLEEP LESS AND WORSE

The body cannot properly follow the sleep/wake rhythms, especially because the sun rises later and sets later, completely confusing the organism. Most affected are those who sleep little in general and who wake up early in the morning, just because their internal clock can no longer regulate;

WE LOSE CONCENTRATION

Sleeping less and also worse involves the loss of concentration and a general sense of unwillingness linked precisely to the lack of concentration;

WE ARE ALWAYS TIRED

The change in hours also corresponds to a change in temperature and, in fact, involves the need for the body to adapt not only to sleep less but also to get used to the heat.

HOW TO FIGHT THE EFFECTS OF THE LEGAL TIME ON OUR BODY

Even if on average you return to normal in maximum 3 weeks (but most of us can return to normal life in 4-5 days), to make sure that the body gets used quickly to the change of time we can follow the following precautions:

EAT LIGHT

Eating light food, introducing vegetables and seasonal fruit into our diet, helps the body to remain hydrated and not be overwhelmed by the humoral changes due to the change of hour;

OUTDOOR PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Walking, running, moving and doing outdoor activities are essential elements in order not to be overwhelmed by the change of hour. If you do physical activity, moreover, you consume energy and therefore potentially sleep more;

NO COFFEE AND CAFFEINE AFTER 5 PM

Caffeine is a psychoactive substance that can compromise sleep-wake rhythms. For this reason, it should be taken with caution during times of transition from one hour to another, precisely to prevent the body from assimilating it.

DRINK LOTS OF WATER

Just like vegetables and fruit, water hydrates the body by transporting oxygen to our cells and thus helping us overcome the jet-lag effect.

RECONSTITUENT CARE

With the arrival of the heat and the good weather, it could be useful a restorative care to begin under the supervision of a doctor or a naturopath in coincidence with the arrival of summertime. Passionflower helps against insomnia problems, green tea is excellent for deflation and draining and royal jelly energizes.